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Mosquito Larvae Killer


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#1 TameYourself

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Posted 14 March 2005 - 11:50 AM

Mosquito Killers
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Is it safe to use these on turtle ponds? I have a major mosquito larvae problem on all my outdoor ponds. I just added some minnow to one of my stock tanks, to see if they will eat some of them.

#2 QZ

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Posted 14 March 2005 - 12:31 PM

As far as I know they are safe with turtles, although killifish/mosquito fish are a more biological approach. I have used the dunks, but mostly rely on the killifish to eat them. the fish have survived and bred in my pond and I overwinter some in the indoor tanks. The turtles will eat some, but they are pretty fast.
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#3 TameYourself

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Posted 14 March 2005 - 01:28 PM

Where do you get mosquito fish? I know a friend of mmine has some in his pond, he told me he will give me some, but hasn't yet.

#4 Matt S.

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Posted 14 March 2005 - 03:08 PM

Finding turtle safe methods can be difficult. One easy way to prevent mosquito larvae is with agitationů.Add a pump to keep the water moving.

#5 TameYourself

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Posted 14 March 2005 - 03:11 PM

I have a pump, filter and fountain to agitate the water. There are still millions of them! Alot of them get sucked into the filter, and it is hard to get them out when I clean the filter pads. darn mosquitoes. All of those products say that they are safe for fish, fish sem to be more sensitive to water than turtles, so I would think it would work. Unless the turtles ate it...

#6 Matt S.

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Posted 14 March 2005 - 03:41 PM

Also, I have read weekly water changes help.
About the pads You could boil them. for a bit...that would kill any larvae.

#7 seanmadriaga

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Posted 14 March 2005 - 09:19 PM

try adding a school of gambusia ( aka mosquito fish? ) im pretty sure they are hard to come by, but type 'pond fish' under www.ebay.com and you'll find it in there.

#8 QZ

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Posted 14 March 2005 - 11:06 PM

Not sure if Gambusia and Killifish are the same- but my pond books all say Gambusia are good. I'm pretty sure mine are killifish; whatever I've got- they survived winter outdoors in a pond only 2ft deep-they're hardy. they look ike gambusia, but less golden and with some neon looking markings on them.
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#9 TameYourself

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Posted 15 March 2005 - 07:12 AM

hmm, I will look into those fish, see if I can find any... thanks

#10 Terrapene

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Posted 15 March 2005 - 03:42 PM

not really sure but if it's for a weeded pond a load of mosquitofish would do the job

heres a link- http://liveaquaria.c...cfm?pCatId=1530

#11 Fluz2

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Posted 15 March 2005 - 05:04 PM

not really sure but if it's for a weeded pond a load of mosquitofish would do the job

heres a link- http://liveaquaria.c...cfm?pCatId=1530

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

i got my mosquito fish atthe pond supply store i think they were 6.00 for i/2 dozen but hey gaveme 12 for that price have survived te winter well some places the health dept gives tem away free. they did here but i was to late all gone

#12 TameYourself

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Posted 16 March 2005 - 07:14 AM

Good ideas, maybe I can contact the local fish and wildlife dept and see if they can help me. Thanks guys

#13 DiscoBC

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Posted 22 March 2005 - 06:14 PM

i would definitely say to go with the fish as a solution. even if you can't find mosquito fish, plain feeder goldfish will accomplish the same thing. almost any fish that can survive in the pond will happily devour insect larvae. it's the safest method for mosquito control in a pond.

#14 TameYourself

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Posted 22 March 2005 - 06:25 PM

I caught a bunch on minnows out of the bayou and put them outside, I hope those work.

#15 jsquanls

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Posted 25 March 2005 - 10:58 AM

Just get a few mosquito fish they can eat more than 100 larvae a day

#16 Camwagon

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Posted 07 April 2005 - 10:22 PM

I actually worked for a company that used biological methods to kill mosquito larvae last summer and I am doing it again this summer. The gambusia are good for permanent bodies of water. The "larvicides" we used to actually kill the larvae, it is called VectoLex, consists of a type of bacteria that grows out of control in the gut of a mosquito larvae. The bacteria were preserved in spore form on these corn kernels which we would sprinkle into the standing water where mosquito larvae were present. The mosquito larvae would eat the grains and would therfore ingest the spores of the bacteria. We even used the latter in forest preserves so I know it would be fine with turtles. The website for the company says this about the larvicide:
VectoLex is a biological mosquito larvicide that offers efficacious, persistent control of mosquitoes in tough environmental conditions. VectoLex kills mosquitoes while preserving mosquito-eating wildlife.

Hope this helps, I guess I started rambling.

#17 TameYourself

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Posted 08 April 2005 - 06:34 AM

I actually worked for a company that used biological methods to kill mosquito larvae last summer and I am doing it again this summer. The gambusia are good for permanent bodies of water. The "larvicides" we used to actually kill the larvae, it is called VectoLex, consists of a type of bacteria that grows out of control in the gut of a mosquito larvae. The bacteria were preserved in spore form on these corn kernels which we would sprinkle into the standing water where mosquito larvae were present. The mosquito larvae would eat the grains and would therfore ingest the spores of the bacteria. We even used the latter in forest preserves so I know it would be fine with turtles. The website for the company says this about the larvicide:
VectoLex is a biological mosquito larvicide that offers efficacious, persistent control of mosquitoes in tough environmental conditions. VectoLex kills mosquitoes while preserving mosquito-eating wildlife.

Hope this helps, I guess I started rambling.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


What is the website?

#18 Camwagon

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Posted 08 April 2005 - 07:37 AM

www.clarkemosquito.com

#19 VanillaShake311

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Posted 08 April 2005 - 12:07 PM

I have mosquito fish ... you just hafta buy a few and they populate in the pond really quickly. And I don't have problems with mosquitos except for the normal amount that flies around.

#20 Camwagon

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Posted 08 April 2005 - 03:33 PM

I actually did have to put gambusia into a few ponds last year and they are really good for clearing out mosquitos.




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