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My 300 gal stock tank


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#1 JsX

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Posted 11 May 2008 - 07:46 PM

I finally setup a stock tank summer home for my turtles. I didn't plan on adding a water pump, however, solar
seemed pretty cool, and a bio-filter seems like a good idea. Since I plan on doing 1/2-3/4 water changes every other week, I'm hoping an established bio-filter can aid in adding and establishing the bacteria to the new water faster.

I used retaining wall pieces to create a hollow circle with small cracks for fishes, crayfishes, and snails to use as an escape and a place call home. I'm also debating on adding crushed coral and snail shells as substrate.

I need to build a top, however, I don't know which style to build. I have a few ideas, but every time I see a picture, I change my plan. Predator wise, I think Cats are going to be the biggest problem. When I had my 100gal pond up, cats would watch my gold fish. Occasionally, I'd find a dead fish around the pond.

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To be honest, I'm pretty disappointed with the solar water pump. This thing is suppose to be 211gph (http://www.siliconso...tem-p-17865.php). Pump is tiny. I don't think the panels are big enough to charge and run the pump at the same time. 6:30pm, the pump is barely running. If I can figure out the charge cycle and battery nonsense, I know the pump is capable of lifting and supplying water to a bio-filter. I'm going to mount the solar panels on my tool shed once I get my bio-filter running and cover built.

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#2 ninja_turt

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Posted 11 May 2008 - 08:26 PM

that looks sweet....i bet ur turt is loving his/her new home....can't wait till i have the money to build meself a pond

#3 Kat67

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Posted 11 May 2008 - 08:36 PM

It looks wonderful! Just like most new set-ups I'm sure you will work the kinks out!

#4 Chris136

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Posted 11 May 2008 - 08:51 PM

What a great idea! That solar pannel must be a great money saver!

#5 CLAWS

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Posted 12 May 2008 - 12:13 AM

I finally setup a stock tank summer home for my turtles. I didn't plan on adding a water pump, however, solar
seemed pretty cool, and a bio-filter seems like a good idea. Since I plan on doing 1/2-3/4 water changes every other week, I'm hoping an established bio-filter can aid in adding and establishing the bacteria to the new water faster.

I used retaining wall pieces to create a hollow circle with small cracks for fishes, crayfishes, and snails to use as an escape and a place call home. I'm also debating on adding crushed coral and snail shells as substrate.

I need to build a top, however, I don't know which style to build. I have a few ideas, but every time I see a picture, I change my plan. Predator wise, I think Cats are going to be the biggest problem. When I had my 100gal pond up, cats would watch my gold fish. Occasionally, I'd find a dead fish around the pond.

Posted Image

To be honest, I'm pretty disappointed with the solar water pump. This thing is suppose to be 211gph ( http://www.siliconso...tem-p-17865.php ). Pump is tiny. I don't think the panels are big enough to charge and run the pump at the same time. 6:30pm, the pump is barely running. If I can figure out the charge cycle and battery nonsense, I know the pump is capable of lifting and supplying water to a bio-filter. I'm going to mount the solar panels on my tool shed once I get my bio-filter running and cover built.

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Hi,

Nice setup there. I put a space between your brackets so you can now key on your link.

So you have an 18V solar power with an 18V pump. If you haven't charged the battery up fully first, you might try that. The pump won't run too well on low voltage. If you got a volt meter or can borrow one that would help with checking the battery voltage. You could then tell hours of operation with one charge.

One though on the bio-filter. I started with bio-rings in my canister filters in my 400 gallon snapper tank. After several months I yanked all the bio-ring out of the filters just to see what would happen. Well to my surprise nothing. I figured my ammonia would start to increase, but the ammonia and nitrite remained at zero even after I would do 97% water changes. What had happened is the nitrifying bacteria colonized on the sides of my metal tank. Once seasoned the walls of the tank got a rough surface and the nitrifying bacteria colonized on that. So all my canister filter have no bio-media in them just mech. sponges etc. Might consider that. Bio-filters are nice but I don't think you really need them, just the mechanical filtration will do.

If the solar panel and pump were designed to work together then it should work. If it doesn't I would be sure to make a phone call.

#6 Shashi M.

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Posted 12 May 2008 - 07:05 AM

If that system does get up and running the way you want it to, and I hope it would, it would be a very environmentally friendly habitat. Always wanted to set up an outdoor habitat for my turts, this gives me an idea. Nice RES BTW. Good job. Thanks for sharing ;).

#7 LisaD

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Posted 12 May 2008 - 08:09 AM

I have the same stock tank outside. Pea soup ater has long been a problem. I'm concerned the filter you have may not perform over time the way it is supposed too. The water tends to get hot rapidly in the summer as well without more shade cover even at 300gs. I've had to make a DIY filter, chang eup the media, increase the shade, build a nest box-not for eggs per se-but for them to up ramp and find more shade and dry off completely, and finally consideirng adding a UV sterilizer-a newer model Amanda1 in my same climate and who helps helm Turtle Homes recommended-she told me the key is to connect it through the filter not run it separately, which I did before with pea soup result-so hope yours combined works. I've got the plants, straw and all the misc. but in there it is my only outside waterway that has had the pea soup issue for 3 years off and on-my inground liner ponds, buried water basins, waterlands and landwaters never see the pea soup. I've also heard from other keepers to add large substrate rock on the bottom but that was mixed result too. I have gravel, lava rock, and course sponges and nets in the filter.

#8 Kat67

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Posted 16 May 2008 - 11:04 AM

First thing you must do is min. your shade and max. your sun by tilting your solar panels in the right angle. Maybe this will help. :)

Posted Image

You also can add another panel to increase your power and ensure a fully charged battery back up.

Edited by Kat67, 16 May 2008 - 11:04 AM.


#9 ninja_turt

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Posted 20 May 2008 - 10:03 PM

where'd you buy the rubbermaid stock tank at? i've tried home depot and lowes but they don't seem to have it? did you get it from the garden section? also where'd u get those flat rocks as well? by the way your pond looks awesome.

Edited by ninja_turt, 20 May 2008 - 10:04 PM.


#10 LisaD

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Posted 21 May 2008 - 03:14 AM

Ninja you can Goggle Rubbmaid and up they come from manufacter and then on their site click where to buy in your area. I got mine at Ace Hardware, pond supplies store, and Tractor Supply and maybe you can check those and/or always try the farm/feed stores in your area. Good luck.

#11 JsX

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Posted 21 May 2008 - 06:43 PM

To my surprise, the water isn't green. It is cloudy, but cloudy water is expected with new setups. I did a 30% water change after the 7th day. I'm watching the water and testing etc etc.

I haven't mastered the solar panel and battery situation yet because I'm still playing around with the settings. It runs during the day and ~4 hours at night.

I found a local feed store that could order the 300gal stock tank. I found the rocks at home depot. I used retaining walls for the base of the center structure and paver's for the flat surface top.

Turtles love their summer home. Plenty of sun, places to hide, and room. My smallest YBS and largest RES are afraid to bask, but those two have always been afraid of anything that moves.

#12 ninja_turt

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Posted 22 May 2008 - 09:46 PM

thnx for the infos lisa and jsx....

#13 lspiderl

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Posted 23 May 2008 - 12:51 PM

what have you done to secure the basking area to make sure it cant tip or fall over ?

are they cemented together or simply stacked ?

because if tehre simply stacked it could be a potential danger if a rock were to come loose and trap a turt undernieth

#14 JsX

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Posted 25 May 2008 - 03:01 PM

The base is secure and sturdy. 3/4 of each brick rests on another. The openings are smaller than my smallest turtle, so none of them can get in the center. I was hoping this would be a haven for fish. I added 20 rosy reds and 36 comets, but no fish survived a week.

The flat stone on top holds the other 3 stones in place. The structure doesn't move.



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It took 2 weeks for the water to turn green and cloudy. I did a 3/4 water change
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#15 Super_Snapper

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Posted 06 June 2008 - 06:27 PM

1/2 to 3/4 water changes every other week? For a 300-gallon stock tank, that would be a lot of water. I'd only try that if I lived beside a river or something.

Edited by Super_Snapper, 06 June 2008 - 06:28 PM.


#16 Fluz2

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Posted 07 June 2008 - 04:18 AM

you could try some water plants in there. water hyacinth, duckweed. water lettuce, anachris etc.

#17 calvinthedestroyer

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Posted 08 November 2009 - 12:41 AM

Wow, I used the same tank for my indoor pond.
Indoor pond made from a rubber made tub from TSC
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The turtle I had lived there for ten years, He passed away after a power outage left our house without heat in the middle of winter. The vet said my turtle had severe bronchitis that caused his death.

I still have my tank but, the next time I set it up I'm buying one of these:
apc back-ups (battery Back up unit)

#18 animal kingdom2

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Posted 08 November 2009 - 06:07 PM

Wow, I love the indoor one, what a great habitat! Now if only I could convince hubby to do that in the living room. Sigh.

#19 calvinthedestroyer

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Posted 11 November 2009 - 10:15 PM

Wow, I love the indoor one, what a great habitat! Now if only I could convince hubby to do that in the living room. Sigh.

That Tank is pretty heavy once you fill it with water, I don't think it's a good idea to put it in your living room. It might end up in the basement!
Hopefully your house is on a slab and there is no basment.

#20 animal kingdom

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Posted 14 November 2009 - 07:36 PM

LOL, in AZ we don't do basements. We're built on caliche (nature's cement). We also don't do attics and rarely 2nd floors - heat rises, so a 100 degree plus day would not be great upstairs.




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