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is this toxic?


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#1 trsatrtr

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Posted 24 June 2010 - 11:22 AM

trumpet vine.jpg
I have these growing all over my yard. I have been told it is a trumpet vine but I don't know the scientific name, so I haven't found it on any plant list. This particular plant is growing in a corner of my yard that I would love to turn into a toroise pen. Unfortunately my russians would not be able to resist these orange flowers. Thanks!

#2 BoxTurtleLover

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Posted 24 June 2010 - 03:11 PM

Here is some information - I am very careful about what goes in or around my turtle pens...many people also don't know that tomatoe plants (leaves) are highly toxic to turtles...The warning below as to your vine indicates it is somewhat toxic to mammals. I would avoid.

Campsis radicans, Trumpet Creeper or Trumpet Vines has large trumpet shaped flowers that are bright red to orange on the outside, yellow inside and grow in clusters of 2 to 9 Flowers. Trumpet vine with it's bright red flowers attracts hummingbirds and provides valuable cover for birds and small mammals. Wild Campsis radicans Trumpet Creeper vine will climb trees or woody structures but is usually found sprawling on the ground or over a wood fence post. Plant Trumpet Vine in rich, organic soil and use as a loose, sprawling groundcover, to cascade over a rock wall, as a point of interest on a single fence post, or as a spectacular sweep up the side of a stone building.

Wild Campsis radicans Trumpet Creeper vine like most vines may grow aggressively and should be planted where it's spread will not be a problem or can be controlled by mowing. Campsis radicans Trumpet Creeper is an attractive hummingbird flower occurring naturally in open woods, thickets, cliffs, stream banks, old fields, and along roadsides from Florida to Texas, Arkansas and Oklahoma, north to New Jersey and Pennsylvania, and west to Kentucky, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Missouri, and southeastern Kansas. Campsis radicans Trumpet Creeper has been naturalized north to Connecticut, Ohio and Michigan. (-37F) Zones 3 to 9, (Bignoniacceae Family)

Extreme cold may damage seeds, plant seeds in early spring.

Alternate Names

Bignonia radicans var. praecox. Bignonia radicans, Campsis radicans forma minor, Campsis radicans var. atropurpurea, Campsis radicans forma praecox, Campsis radicans var. speciosa, Campsis radicans var. praecox, Campsis radicans subforma praecox, Campsis radicans var. aurea, Campsis radicans forma flava, cow-itch, Gelseminum radicans, Tecoma radicans var. minor, Tecoma radicans var. atropurpurea, Tecoma radicans var. lutea, Tecoma radicans var. praecox, Tecoma radicans var. flava, Tecoma radicans var. speciosa, Tecoma radicans, Tecoma speciosa, Trumpet flower, Trumpet vine.

Warning: Contact with the leaves and flowers of trumpet creeper results in skin redness and swelling among mammals. It is also slightly toxic if ingested.

#3 trsatrtr

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Posted 24 June 2010 - 09:10 PM

Thanks for the information. I guess I will have to remove these before I can put the torts in. I think the bright orange flowers would be too tempting.

#4 otheribenjii

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Posted 22 August 2010 - 10:45 AM

Thanks for the information. I guess I will have to remove these before I can put the torts in. I think the bright orange flowers would be too tempting.


You could relocate the plant to a different part of the yard:) They are quite pretty.

#5 fcarozo

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Posted 05 January 2011 - 02:49 PM

Thank you very much for the information, it was very useful for me.
I have a dog (not a turtle, sorry.. :) ) who use to eat trumpet flowers and leaves, and he suffer sometimes haemorrhagic diarrhea and I found now trumpet creeper may cause this, as we don't find other medical reason.
Thank you!

#6 center5150

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Posted 13 August 2011 - 09:50 PM

i saw a wild ebt munching on some of those flowers (pretty sure its the same) in a neighbors yard i was mowing a week or so ago... i didnt follow the turtle around or anything but it seemed to like them... even stuck around munching while i was mowing the yard and got within a few feet... not sure what it means but, they must taste good right?




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