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Big Heads getting a morning drink


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#21 Andy's Auto

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Posted 08 August 2011 - 08:18 AM

Some keepers have successfully hatched eggs found in enclosures with lone wild caught females, but I've yet to hear af anyone having success in breeding these guys. Courtship is typically a very violent affair, and most aren't willing to risk serious injuries and/or death to their adults just for a shot at a single egg clutch. This is a species which probably requires alot more study in the wild before we see any measure of success in captive breeding programs. I would be interested to know if Batagur has ever observed mating behaviours in captive Platysternon?


It is very well known that Julie Tougas in Canada has had repeated success with Bigheads.

#22 thinkin_feller

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Posted 12 August 2011 - 07:38 PM

It is very well known that Julie Tougas in Canada has had repeated success with Bigheads.


That's a very popular misconception. Julie was successful in breeding a pair of bigheads, and did eventually get a viable egg which successfully hatched after the proper incubation time. Unfortunately, both the adult female and hatchling died shortly thereafter, and to my knowledge that is the best anyone has done in Canada. That's the story as I've heard it from several individuals, I should clarify that that isn't first hand information.... I've never personally met Julie, though I'm very aware of the success she's had in breeding other rare Asian species.

Edited by thinkin_feller, 12 August 2011 - 07:41 PM.


#23 Andy's Auto

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Posted 14 August 2011 - 06:43 AM

Dan, that is odd. Not on this PC but I do have a few pics of at least three Platysternon she had hatched.

And of course the famous oviparius Bighead, but not from Julie.

#24 thinkin_feller

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Posted 14 August 2011 - 08:46 PM

Dan, that is odd. Not on this PC but I do have a few pics of at least three Platysternon she had hatched.

And of course the famous oviparius Bighead, but not from Julie.


Huh...

I'm certainly very interested to get clarification on this point, because there are a few details of her work with megacephalum which change depending on who's telling the story. The one thing that was consistent in every version was that she only produced a single hatchling, which didn't last long. It's interesting that you have photos of 3 different animals, which would seem to suggest that there have been multiple successful breeding events in Julie's collection. Either that or a female triple clutched off of a single 'load'? (sorry couldn't think of a better word)

I do know the keeper (PCW Phoenix) who was lucky enough to look into his bighead enclosure only to discover a living hatchling roaming around..... talk about a doubletake! In that instance, the female was a recent wildcaught.

I would really like to see any of Julie's bighead hatchling pictures that you may be able to find.

Thanks

Dan

#25 Andy's Auto

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Posted 15 August 2011 - 03:33 AM

Huh...

I'm certainly very interested to get clarification on this point, because there are a few details of her work with megacephalum which change depending on who's telling the story. The one thing that was consistent in every version was that she only produced a single hatchling, which didn't last long. It's interesting that you have photos of 3 different animals, which would seem to suggest that there have been multiple successful breeding events in Julie's collection. Either that or a female triple clutched off of a single 'load'? (sorry couldn't think of a better word)

I do know the keeper (PCW Phoenix) who was lucky enough to look into his bighead enclosure only to discover a living hatchling roaming around..... talk about a doubletake! In that instance, the female was a recent wildcaught.

I would really like to see any of Julie's bighead hatchling pictures that you may be able to find.

Thanks

Dan


Dan, going to do some digging today. I know I have them on disc. I would bet this goes back to 2005-2008.

And there is still some outside hope as well. One of my old mods, Andy A. still has all the bigheads I sold him in 2005 and as far as I know he still gets alot of eggs, just no hatchlings. Can't be that hard. I heard that Diademata were inpossible to hatch but I have two out the egg and six more eggs cooking and trust, not even thinking out the box on them. From the ground to the cooker.

#26 Batagur

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Posted 11 September 2011 - 04:44 PM

That's a very popular misconception. Julie was successful in breeding a pair of bigheads, and did eventually get a viable egg which successfully hatched after the proper incubation time. Unfortunately, both the adult female and hatchling died shortly thereafter, and to my knowledge that is the best anyone has done in Canada. That's the story as I've heard it from several individuals, I should clarify that that isn't first hand information.... I've never personally met Julie, though I'm very aware of the success she's had in breeding other rare Asian species.

This is true. She hatched them once and they died. I think there was more than one hatchling though. I searched my emails from her and found one from Sept 2007 that said her male had just died. I was trying to help her get another male but it didn't work with the permitting issues and she wanted sexed pairs and I could only provide males.

I have witnessed mating with individuals I have. They are in a huge enclosure so I haven't found any eggs or hatchlings yet. I palpate the female when she should be gravid (June/July) but I have never felt eggs in her.

A friend of mine in Europe has bred them and hatched them over the past couple of years. I beleive others are now breeding them too. TN aquarium is working hard at it, but so far I don't think anyone in the U.S. has actually bred and hatched them in captivity yet.

Females need to be able to crawl under some kind of substrate (ie. a mat of sphagnum moss) to be comfortable nesting. If they don't have this, they will often just dump their eggs in the water.

#27 ariadana

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Posted 13 September 2011 - 09:10 AM

Hi, i was just wondering...what could be the cause of their deaths?
Big Headed Turtle is like a mystery turtle to me. Most of other turtles' keepers had kept them, but most of them just died.

Unlike the Snapping Turtle, where we could found lots of turtles keepers to share about the turtles. With Big Headed Turtle, there is noturtle keeper who could tell and share about the turtle. Most of their turtles on average died 1-2 months after being kept. Others said there are some who kept them for more than 3 years. But then again, is this true? I don't even know. :(

#28 Batagur

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Posted 13 September 2011 - 10:44 AM

Hi, i was just wondering...what could be the cause of their deaths?
Big Headed Turtle is like a mystery turtle to me. Most of other turtles' keepers had kept them, but most of them just died.

Unlike the Snapping Turtle, where we could found lots of turtles keepers to share about the turtles. With Big Headed Turtle, there is noturtle keeper who could tell and share about the turtle. Most of their turtles on average died 1-2 months after being kept. Others said there are some who kept them for more than 3 years. But then again, is this true? I don't even know. :(

If set up properly, they are no more difficult to keep than any other turtle. They are very hardy and do just fine in captivity. So, I'm not sure exactly where you're getting your information from. If you let them get hot, they will die. Otherwise, they are simple. I have some I've had for about 15 years. There are plenty of people around that have kept them in captivity for 5 - 30 or more years and can tell you plenty about them. No real mystery with them. They are just like anything else, provide them with an optimal environment and they will be fine. Breeding and hatching eggs is a bit difficult but still staight forward when it does happens.

Edited by Batagur, 13 September 2011 - 10:45 AM.


#29 ariadana

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Posted 13 September 2011 - 03:56 PM

If set up properly, they are no more difficult to keep than any other turtle. They are very hardy and do just fine in captivity. So, I'm not sure exactly where you're getting your information from. If you let them get hot, they will die. Otherwise, they are simple. I have some I've had for about 15 years. There are plenty of people around that have kept them in captivity for 5 - 30 or more years and can tell you plenty about them. No real mystery with them. They are just like anything else, provide them with an optimal environment and they will be fine. Breeding and hatching eggs is a bit difficult but still staight forward when it does happens.


Wow :blink: . Great to hear that :) Thanks.

Most of the turtle keepers in my country said most of their big headed turtle died between 1-2 months only. But then again, i heard that they kept it outdoor, without any proper climate control, and most of them just clueless why their turtle just died after 1 or 2 months :D

So, basically if i maintain the temperature within 54-73F, then it should be okay, right? :)
Mine eats a lot, 2-3 fishes a day (I feed them platys). Then again, my big headed turtle is only 6cm long. Is it normal to eat that much? A Big Headed Turtle is such an active turtle though, i'm amazed :)

#30 naeff002

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Posted 20 September 2011 - 06:19 AM

You really could over feed them, they are really big eaters. You could feed them more variety in there diet




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