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Guppies, Mollies Or Platies?


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#1 Number1sticky

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Posted 16 January 2012 - 04:15 PM

I want to start breeding fish for my turtles. They will be in a 20 gallon (the fish). But which fish are healthier for them: guppies or mollies/platies? I tried guppies for a little while but only had a 5 gallon to breed them in and it took too long for them to get big enough. Eventually I want to be able to just put the breeding fish in with my turtles, but I’ll need to get started outside of it first if I want any to survive.

Thanks for any help!!!

Edited by Number1sticky, 16 January 2012 - 04:16 PM.


#2 Erik

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Posted 16 January 2012 - 04:44 PM

I would go with guppies. Feed them high grade fish food which will somewhat increase their food value for the turtles.

#3 Nicky Johnson

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Posted 16 January 2012 - 08:35 PM

I want to start breeding fish for my turtles. They will be in a 20 gallon (the fish). But which fish are healthier for them: guppies or mollies/platies? I tried guppies for a little while but only had a 5 gallon to breed them in and it took too long for them to get big enough. Eventually I want to be able to just put the breeding fish in with my turtles, but I’ll need to get started outside of it first if I want any to survive.

Thanks for any help!!!


I've started breeding guppies for my RES. They have only ever had live guppies or tadpoles. I have 2 female guppies and 1 male in a tank (I did have 3 females but 1 is missing. I believe it must have died and then the others/the snails polished off the remains.) I will probably get another female to replace it. I also keep my ramshorn snails in there too as another source of live food for the turts. I used to keep the snails in small fish bowl but then I got the guppies and now keep them in there so they also help to eat uneaten food.

#4 Number1sticky

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Posted 17 January 2012 - 04:43 PM

I've started breeding guppies for my RES. They have only ever had live guppies or tadpoles. I have 2 female guppies and 1 male in a tank (I did have 3 females but 1 is missing. I believe it must have died and then the others/the snails polished off the remains.) I will probably get another female to replace it. I also keep my ramshorn snails in there too as another source of live food for the turts. I used to keep the snails in small fish bowl but then I got the guppies and now keep them in there so they also help to eat uneaten food.


I've looked for snails to put in the tank. Because I know that would be easy and my turtles could snack on them when ever they want. But I don't know where to find them. The only ones I can find in the pet store are mystery snails. They have some other kind in their tanks but they don't know what kind they are so I don't want to get them because I've heard some snails can be bad for them.

#5 turtlemann2

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Posted 19 January 2012 - 10:00 AM

all three : ) variety is key : ) set up a good breeding tank and not only will they be colorful and attractive but will produce a good amount of fry : )

one thing about guppies is that you CAN sex them so you dont have an excess of males eating fish food and possibly fry and harasing females as much as if you would have mollys and platys where the two sexes look alike. just somthing to think about

although it does take a long time for them to get any size on them : (

#6 Nicky Johnson

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Posted 21 January 2012 - 08:22 PM

I've looked for snails to put in the tank. Because I know that would be easy and my turtles could snack on them when ever they want. But I don't know where to find them. The only ones I can find in the pet store are mystery snails. They have some other kind in their tanks but they don't know what kind they are so I don't want to get them because I've heard some snails can be bad for them.


My RES love ramshorn snails- their shells are easy to crack and the colour means they are easy to spot. They are available in my pet store (in New Zealand) but I got my original batch online from our version of ebay as sellers on sites like that are often cheaper. The ramshorns breed insanly especially if their is plenty of food. However it does take months until they actually get to be a good size. One time I put a couple in the turtle tank (smallish ones) and they got sucked up the filter without me noticing and I didn't even notice when I cleaned the filter a few times and then I went to clean it again and there was like 50 tiny snails in there as the first 2 had bred inside the warmth of the filter and plenty of food. It took me a long time to free the filter of snails. At least I had a good supply for my turts though.

So maybe if your pet store doesn't have any then try online? They can be shipped as I got mine in a airtight food bag with water and they all survived. I've only ever tried ramshorn snails.

#7 Nicky Johnson

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Posted 21 January 2012 - 08:26 PM

all three : ) variety is key : ) set up a good breeding tank and not only will they be colorful and attractive but will produce a good amount of fry : )

one thing about guppies is that you CAN sex them so you dont have an excess of males eating fish food and possibly fry and harasing females as much as if you would have mollys and platys where the two sexes look alike. just somthing to think about

although it does take a long time for them to get any size on them : (


Yes that is a good point about sexing the guppies. They are obvious which are which and that is great. I think it is suggested to have a male to female ratio of 1:3. My 2 females are pregnant so I'm taking the male out for a while (guppies are pretty hardy- they seem to be able to handle change) to give the females a rest as he still chases them.

#8 Cheloniphile

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 08:49 AM

I like guppies as feeder fish that I can breed. They are live bearers so they pretty much run on auto pilot. I have a ten gallon tank in which I have grown snails for my tutles for years. I used to breed guppies as well but not in the same tank - the fish eat the new snails. I use an undergravel filter and a small Tetra whisper filter. The siphon tube from the Whisper is inserted into the uplift tube of the undergravel. Only one uplift tube is needed. I have small aquarium gravel in the tank to stop new snails from going under the undergravel filter.

It's easy to maintain, no lights. I just drop some lettuce in the tank and occasionally some other left over dinner vegetables. When I want to feed snails to my turts, I place a large leaf of Romaine on the surface of the water and within a couple of hours it's covered with snails. Transfer the lettuce to the turtle tank, shake it to drop the snails and leave the lettuce for the turtles as well. When my snail population gets low, I stop taking them out for 2 or 3 weeks.

PetCo and PetSmart have been excellent sources for free snail breeding stock - they're always trying to get rid of the little round, black snails that seem to infest their tanks. I keep the new snails in a separate container for a week or so with standard, very inexpensive antibiotic and antifungal meds (Erythromycin and Pimafix) in the water just in case - then I add them to the breeding tank.

Now I'm thinking of starting up with guppies again. I would use the same tandem filter scheme but to get rapid growth I'd have to add a heater. They will survive well at room temperature water but they won't grow as fast. I started buying feeder fish a few years back because my turtle population was getting too big and the guppies weren't breeding and growing fast enough. So maybe I'll do a combination of both breeding and buying.

I do like having feeder sized fish in all my turtle tanks. I feed my turts in their regular tanks - too many to use separate containers. The fish eat all leftovers and even pick at turtle feces. Musks and spotteds don't have much luck trying to catch live fish so feeders in their tanks just become part of the environment. Painteds, RES, larger maps, and blandings, and DBTS are capable predators, especially blandings and DBTs, so the fish don't last long.

Paul (Cheloniphile)

#9 turtlemann2

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 12:06 PM

another thing to consider is goldfish in an outdoor pond they redily breed and usually over two or three seasons become over populated just another aspect to consider : ) dont get your goldfish breeding pond and your turtle pond mixed up though, : )




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