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What is these Turtle species

What is these Turtle species

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#1 aqua26

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Posted 28 June 2012 - 11:03 PM

HI,

My younger brother Got these yesterday I am not a expert or use to take care of turtles.
Can you please tell me what these turtle species are ?

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#2 animal kingdom2

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 09:39 PM

If you could post pictures of the plastron (underside) as well as the head and neck, that would help in identifying what type they are. Where are you located? Where did your brother acquire these?

#3 Jordan H

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Posted 07 July 2012 - 03:52 PM

They look like Indian Tent turtles. I'm not sure the specific type but research that species and you should be able to find out which kind they are specifically. Where did you get those? I've never seen them available before.

#4 justatwinturbo

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Posted 07 July 2012 - 05:14 PM

The one on top is an indian roofed turtle (pangshura tecta) the one on the bottom is an pink ringed, aka circled tent turtle (pangshura tentoria circumdata)

#5 aqua26

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Posted 08 July 2012 - 04:10 AM

Both the turtles are same species since My brother got them form a guy who had these & few months back they hatched few more.
That guy also don't know what they are.
I tries to make them upside down & click a photo of the underside but could't do that since they twist back very fast.
But i have got another close-up which is more clear.
I stay in India
.Posted Image

#6 justatwinturbo

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Posted 08 July 2012 - 08:07 AM

They don't look like the same species, its possible that the guy who hatches them has both species.

#7 aqua26

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Posted 08 July 2012 - 01:25 PM

One of them is a male & one is Female So that's the reason why they look different. (That's What Think)
Coz i have been told that this a couple of turtles.

#8 justatwinturbo

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Posted 08 July 2012 - 02:10 PM

No, they are too young to sex. Males and females of both species, do not look different from one another. I'm certain you have 2 different species, both are native to the same area, with circumdata's range being a little smaller.

#9 aqua26

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Posted 08 July 2012 - 09:51 PM

Must Be I am not expert on turtles.
Can I ask you how to take good care of these young ones.

#10 justatwinturbo

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Posted 09 July 2012 - 08:32 AM

You can use the care sheet for graptemys, found here: http://www.chelonia....aptemyscare.htm

Care is the same

#11 aqua26

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Posted 11 July 2012 - 01:55 AM

Some More Photos of Underside.


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#12 aqua26

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Posted 21 July 2012 - 10:54 PM

Are these both of them same breed ? or same species ?

#13 justatwinturbo

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Posted 22 July 2012 - 07:56 AM

No, they are different. They are like I said, tecta and circumdata

#14 Swapnil Vilas Kale

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 12:47 PM

as far i know ... one on the right is
Pangshura tecta aka Indian Roofed turtle

:)
the other one might be the same of opposite sex... but am not sure bout it

#15 gursimran95

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Posted 14 August 2014 - 07:42 AM

 Hello 

Im,Gursimran i found this link on google because i also have the same turtle the one with the pinkish ring on the shell

I also wanted to know how to take care of them . my turtle's shell is getting a little soft and i try to keep him in the sun but he hides in the shade plzz tell me what to do and i also wanted to know how to feed natural food and what natural things to give him to eat because he is on turtle food right now  Please reply !!!



#16 karencjacome

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Posted 14 August 2014 - 09:52 PM

Hello, and welcome to this site.  These two turtles are very rare and are aquatic turtles, so they mainly live in water. Justatwrinturbo really knows much about turtles and the various kinds so I trust his identification.  These turtles may be protected by law in India.

 

Here is a detailed care sheet of information about how to take care of your turtles.  Please follow this information to be certain that your turtles live a long, healthy life.

 

Your turtles look like different kinds of turtles.  Perhaps the guy your brother got them from didn't know he had two kinds.  You can not tell what the sex of a turtle is until it is around 6 or 7 years and then it is often difficult as males and females look much alike.

 

To keep your turtles healthy, you must give them a healthy turtle environment, or place to live.

 

They need:

 

Clean water (change every day since the pee and poop in the water and will get sick if they stay in dirty water)

 

The water should be 5 or 6 inches deep, maybe 4 to 5 inches since they are babies and smaller than adults.

 

They need to have a UVB light, a special kind of light that causes their bodies to metabolize vitamin D and use calcium to build a strong shell.  Otherwise, their shells get soft and then deformed and often they die a slow death--very sad!!!  The UVB is like the sunlight that causes humans to sunburn, but turtles and other reptiles must have this light.  The bulbs are expensive, about $70 and there are many fakes on the market. ZooMed is a good brand.

 

They need a place to climb out of the water easily so they can bask under the UVB light.  The basking area must be secure and not move around or they will not get on the basking area.  The UVB lamp should be about 16-18 inches above the surface of the basking dock.  The basking area should be about 90 degrees F.

 

They should be in a large aquarium.  You will need a larger one when they begin to grow.  Get the largest one you can now.  It can be glass, the best, or a large sweater box (plastic).  Keep the bottom clean or put larger rocks in the bottom.  Sand and small rocks/gravel is not good since some turtles try to eat the rocks and they get blockages that can kill them. The turtles should have a place or several places to hide underwater.  Use aquatic plants or plastic plants, rocks, or other objects that will not leach into the water.  Do not use terra cotta pots, but high fired china ceramics/teacups, etc. are fine to use has hiding places.  This will reduce the stress your turtles feel and will make them feel more secure.

 

For food, your turtles will eat more "meat" than veggies when they are young.  They will constantly beg for food and eat too much.  Feed them every other day about the amount of food that would fit inside their entire head.  They would like to eat earthworms, sow bugs/pill bugs, small crickets, flies and moths.  They also like snails and slugs, but many of these can carry disease that makes your turtles sick.  They might also like small minnows, but do not feed them goldfish since goldfish will stop the abosrption of vitamin B and are not healthy for turtles.  Be sure the insects do not have any insecticide on them.  They will also eat pieces of Romaine lettuce.  Just leave the lettuce in the water all the time and they can eat it when they want.  Do not feed them spinach as it blocks calcium absorption.  Good turtle food brands are ZooMed and Mazuri.  They also have other nutrients like vitamin D in the correct amount.

 

To Gursimran, his turtle probably hides in the shade because the sun is too hot for him.  So, the turtle does not get any UVB light which will cause the shell to get soft and will finally kill the turtle.  So try to get a UVB or mercury vapor light which also produces UVB and let hiim bask under this light.  This should help strengthen the shell.  You can also buy Vitamin D powder and put a little on his food to help his shell get stronger.  BUT, too much Vitamin D can cause problems, too, so it is best to use the UVB light.  Earthworms/nightcrawlers have lots of calcium so this is a good food to help your turlte.  Do get him the right light and earthworms as soon as possible so he doesn't get sicker.

 

Putting the turtle in the sun will give him UVB, BUT turtles can get too hot.  They are the same temperature as their surroundings and cannot cool off.  They can easily get too hot and die--so please be very careful!!! Keep in mind that the sunlight moves during the day and what is in the shade in the morning might be very hot in the afternoon!!!

 

Also, about UVB, a screen, glass or plastic will block about 80-90% of the UVB rays from your turtle, so just putting the tank in the window is not a solution to getting UVB.  Not enought UVB can get through!

 

Your turtles need the same care as a map turtle as discussed in this article below.

 

Please write with other questions you have.  Your turtles are very beautiful and rare!

 

Best wishes.

 

 

 

Genus: Graptemys  (Map Turtle) Care - Darrell Senneke

Graptemys Gallery

This Care Sheet in Japanese

f0-jp.gif - チズガメ属 Graptemys の飼育 ダレル セネーク

f0-es.gifGénero: Graptemys  (Tortugas Mapa) - Darrell Senneke

f0-nl.gifGenus: Graptemys  (Map Turtle) Care - Darrell Senneke

Copyright © 2003, 2004, 2005 World Chelonian Trust. All rights reserved

 

Graptemys barbouri, Barbour's Map Turtle Graptemys caglei, Cagle's Map Turtle Graptemys ernsti, Escambia Map Turtle Graptemys flavimaculata, Yellow-blotched Map Turtle Graptemys geographica, Common Map Turtle Graptemys gibbonsi, Pascagoula Map Turtle Graptemys kohnii, Mississippi Map Turtle Graptemys nigrinoda, Black-knobbed Map Turtle Graptemys oculifera, Ringed Map Turtle Graptemys ouachitensis, Ouachita Map Turtle  Graptemys pseudogeographica, False Map Turtle Graptemys pulchra, Alabama Map Turtle

Graptemys versa, Texas Map Turtle

glb20blalltiny.jpgThis care sheet is intended only to cover the general care of this species. Further research to best develop a maintenance plan for whichever species you are caring for is essential.. 

 

One of the largest Genera in terms of the number of species is Graptemys – the Map turtles. Some naturalists are fond of saying that every watershed East of the Rocky Mountains and North of Mexico in North America is host to its own species. While that may be somewhat of an exaggeration it is true that there are many species and considerable diversity in the Genus. These species are more carnivorous than most turtles with a natural diet that relies heavily on snails, crustaceans and mollusks. Map turtles are sexually dimorphic with males being considerable smaller than females. The typical adult size of males is 5 inches (12 cm) while females may reach 12 inches (30 cm) in length.

 

Long ago map turtles could often be found mixed in with the Red-ear Sliders in “five and dime” stores in the United States.  Unfortunately these turtles (most of whom were Graptemys geographica) usually shared the same fate as the sliders: improper care followed by an early death.  Present knowledge and technology makes it an easily maintained animal as long as a person is willing to provide some basic requirements. Thanks to the success that breeders are having with these species it is now possible to purchase many of these species as hatchlings from captive born stock.  Many of the species are threatened or endangered in nature, do not remove these animals from the wild.   

Graptemyscare.jpg

 

HOUSING MAP TURTLES INDOORS - The most useful form of indoor accommodation for Graptemys consists of an aquarium. For hatchlings I would suggest a water depth of 3 to 6 inches (7.5 to 15 cm) with one end built up with rocks to provide a dry basking spot. A reasonable size aquarium for a hatchling is a 20 gallon: 30 inches by 12 inches, (75 cm by 30 cm). As the animal grows the size of this habitat should be increased. All Map turtles are excellent swimmers so water depth is not as critical a factor as they get older.. A depth of 10 inches up to 30 inches (25 cm to 75 cm) would be fine for turtles between 4 inches (10 cm) and adult size which can reach 8 inches (20 cm). 

 

Water quality is very important. Many problems with aquatic turtles can be averted if one spends a little time and money designing and purchasing an adequate filtration system for your pets. For adult Map turtles we advise canister filters as they are easily cleaned and provide for excellent water quality. Hatchlings are more difficult to provide good filtration for because of the depth of the water, for these a submersible foam filer or power filter and frequent water changes is the rule. . 

 

In one corner of the environment a hardware store reflector clip light lamp should be positioned over a dry basking area to provide artificial basking facilities. This should be positioned to provide a basking spot of 90 degrees F or so (32 degrees C) in that section of the habitat.  The habitat should also be equipped with a full spectrum fluorescent light to provide for UVB. A UVB source is necessary for Vitamin D3 syntheses (needed in calcium metabolism). If preferred to this lighting arrangement a Mercury vapor bulb may be used that fulfills all requirements. Live or plastic aquatic plants are suggested to provide a sense of security and hiding places.

OUTDOOR HOUSING - Predator proof outdoor habitats offer many advantages over indoor accommodations and should seriously be considered as an option during warm weather. A child’s wading pool sunk into the ground in a secure enclosure makes for a serviceable outdoor habitat.  Larger ponds with advanced filtration can be used to provide a spectacular outdoor home for your Map turtle.      

 

DIET. Be careful not to overfeed your Graptemys. I recommend only feeding 2 to 3 times a week for adult turtles and every day or every other day for the rapidly growing hatchlings. Map turtles are highly carnivorous and crayfish, snails, insects, worms may make up a large part of their diet.  Some vegetable matter is also taken with hatchlings eating more duckweed and water plants than the adults.  Many of the commercially prepared turtle diets that exist on the market today are excellent Map turtle food.

 

Additional calcium supplementation is essential. Powdered calcium can be sprinkled all foods. It is suggested that one use calcium supplemented with vitamin D3 if the animal is being maintained indoors and calcium without D3 if it is outdoors. Provision of a cuttlefish bone, which can be gnawed if desired, is also recommended.

 

Some of these species hibernate in nature. After careful research of methods used to safely do this, hibernation facilities may be provided for those that do so.  

 

It should be noted that turtle and tortoise care research is ongoing. As new information becomes available we share this on the World Chelonian Trust web site at www.chelonia.org. Serious keepers find it to be a benefit to have the support of others who keep these species. Care is discussed in our free online email community, which may be joined from the web address above. Please contact us about the many benefits of becoming a member of the World Chelonian Trust.

 

 

 

World Chelonian Trust

www.chelonia.org

PO Box 1445

Vacaville, CA

95696

 Home Page - World Chelonian Trust



#17 gursimran95

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Posted 16 August 2014 - 04:10 AM

Hello and thank you karencjacome for the information.In india we dont have access to uv lights because no aquarium shop knows about it and the are no sites in india from where i can buy them, i am now keeping him in the sun for 20-30 min i stay with him every time hes out side i place him in a tub with little water.And can i feed him powdered eggshell for calcium because unfortunately aquarium shops dont have that also, I give him tomato,coriander,banana,turtle food (taiyo),he does not eat the natural thing i give him but only eats the turtle food. he is about 2.2 inches in size now after i have seen his shell becaome soft i kepp him in a tub filled with water about 1 inches.can i give him cabbage and other green availabe in india or not ?



#18 karencjacome

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Posted 17 August 2014 - 04:57 PM

UVB light bulbs are hard to find in some countries.  If your turtle's shell is soft, this means he is not getting enough vitamin D and calcium and not able to metabolize the vitamin D into calcium because of no UVB or sunlight.  So, it is good that you are taking your turtle in the direct sun for 20-30 minutes a day.  Just be sure he does not overheat as it is easy for turtles to get too hot and die.  They cannot cool down like cats or dogs, or humans, and are the temperature of the water or surroundings they are in. 

 

The soft shell is a symptom of metabolic bone disease.  This is caused from not enough UVB light.  UVB light is from the sun and is what gives humans sunburns, but reptiles, including snakes, lizards, and turtles must have this in order to metabolize vitamin D and form bones and shells.  Otherwise, with not enough UVB, their bones and shells become soft and sometimes the shell becomes deformed.

 

You will want to give your turtle as much sunlight as you can.  Be sure it is direct sun because window glass, screen, and any kind of plastic or acrylic will filter out the UVB rays and you will loose up to 80-90% of the UVB rays.  This will not help the turtle very much! 

 

It is good to give your turtle little pieces of egg shell.  Also, you can feed him small fish, minnows, or mudfish.  You can sometines get these at pet stores or from streams or lakes with a net (if this is legal in your area).  These little fish are very high in calcium which should help your turtle's shell.  Do not give your turtle any kind of goldfish, however, because goldfish keep Vitamin B from metabolizing in turtles.  You can feed him small pieces of cooked chicken and fish, too.  Do not add spices or salt to the fish.  He might also eat scrambled egg or hard boiled egg.  This good nutrition is better than giving him vitamin D powder or human vitamin D because the vitamin D in the powder or pills can really cause constipation for turtles.

 

Try to find red leaf lettuce, or Romaine lettuce, to keep in the tank all the time.  But do not feed him spinach as it interferes with calcium absorption.  I do not know about corriander or cabbage, and these are not on any of the lists to feed turtles.  You can feed him shredded/cut up  pieces of carrots, melons, apples, sweet potatoes or yams (cooked), corn, peas.  Try different things as he is not used to the new food and it might take a time for him to want to eat these.  Basically, however, he will like the animal protein better than the vegetables.

 

Hopefully, you can help your turtle get healthy again with the improved diet and with the sunlight.  It may take time, but it is very worthwhile and good to help him.  Otherwise, he will probably die.  Aquatic or water turtles like yours do eat little fish, bugs such as earthworms/nightcrawlers which grow in the garden, and pill or sow bugs.  If you use insects be certain they have not been sprayed with insecticide or fertilizer which is not good for your turtle.  I like to keep my turtle's food as natural  as possible.  Young aquatic turtles like yours ususally eat more insects and fish rather than vegetables and fruit when they are growing up.

 

When you feed him, try giving him the fish or cooked chicken first before you feed him the taiyo pellets. Sometimes turtles are very stubborn about eating something new.  I would not give him any banana because the high potassium in the banana can interfere with calcium absorption, and  calcium is what your turtle needs right now.  Try giving him earthworms.  You might have to cut them into little pieces with scissors for him to eat.  And, you might have to hold the little fish so he can learn how to catch them.  Use long tongs or tweezers until he learns how to hunt these on his own.  Even a swatted fly or moth would be good for him. You can sprinkle them with a little eggshell so he can get a bite of the eggshell, too.

 

When you do keep him in water, be sure it is deep enough for him to submerge in.  He will be very stressed if he is in just a little water.  He does need a place where he can climb out of the water completely and dry off, usually once a day.  He would also appreciate something to hide in underwater, like a dark coffee cup that he can use as a cave. 

 

And be sure to change the water every day or two, especially since you don't have a filter.  This water change will keep your turtle healthy.  Be sure to let the water sit for 24 hours after you get it out of the tap/pipe since this way the chlorine in the water will dissapate and evaporate and not hurtyour turlte.

 

I hope this information is useful to you .  Please write back with questions and please let me know how the turtle is doing.

 

Best wishes.



#19 karencjacome

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Posted 18 August 2014 - 07:27 AM

I have another question.  How many days/weeks have you been taking the turtle into the sunlight each day?  If it has been each day for several weeks/months, then he is still not getting enough sunlight UVB to help make his shell hard. If this is the case, then he needs to be in the sunlight for a longer period of time each day.  Of course, remember that he can die if he is left in the sun and overheats because turtles cannot cool off themselves.  They are the same temperature as their surroundings which can quickly get very hot in the sun!!!

 

Also, when you put him in the sun, be sure that the back/top of his shell is not underwater as the water will filter out the UVB rays like glass or screens, or plastic windows.  But be sure to put him in deeper water when you bring him back inside.  Probably about 3-5 inches of water is the best.  He will stand on his back legs and put his head out of the water. This is normal when they breathe in air and then they stay underwater for a very long time.  Turtles have an extra lobe on their lungs that lets them stay underwater much longer than humans can!

 

Best wishes, and please let me know how it's going.  Remember that your brother's turtles must have UVB also or their shells will get soft from metabolic bone disease, so they need to go outside with yours each day!



#20 Pranjal Jalota

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Posted 21 November 2014 - 06:47 AM

hey thats indian red circled tent turtle......they are awsum...you know i have a turtle he love watching movies.....he always come to his aquarium and stay in that position for hours until the movie is finished ..especially for how to train your dragon. he is very young...aprox 3 to 4 months.....






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